e-Savings Soiree Series

e-Course: Couponing With Grace

by Beth Montgomery on April 18, 2010 · 2 comments

in Coupons & Rebates, Tips & Basics

This is Part 18 of the 30-day Savings Soiree e-course by In Good Cents. View the most recent course in this series or head to the Saving Soiree e-course main menu.

Want to make sure you don’t miss a new course?   Subscribe to In Good Cents via RSS or e-mail!

I’m pretty sure that Uncle Ben said it best:

“With great power comes great responsibility.”

I’ve given you a power.   The power to save tons of money.   Now, I ask that you use it responsibly.

There are so many amazing deals out there for all of us, there’s no reason to take advantage of the system. Play by the rules.   It only takes a few “bad apples” to ruin it for the rest of us and get stores and manufacturers to lay down more and more policies that make it harder and harder for us to snag a great deal.

So, here is what I ask of you…

Do not change, copy, or otherwise alter coupons.
I think I covered this one a little too well yesterday, so enough said there!

Use coupons only as intended.
Yes, some will argue that there are gray areas in couponing and there are, but let’s keep it simple.

Read the coupon.   All of it.   Even the fine print.   A coupon in a binding legal contract   between you and the company who released the coupon.   It’s the fine print counts.   Not if the cashier takes it, the register doesn’t beep, or the barcode you’ve finely decoded.

    • Don’t use expired coupons. Unless you know for sure your store’s coupon policy is that they do accept expired coupons.
    • Use coupons on items as they were intended. Simply read it.   If it says “Progresso Light Soup”, then buy Progresso Light Soup, not Campbell’s Light Soup or regular Progresso Soup.
    • Do not use coupons for items you did not purchase. If you didn’t buy Tide, don’t slip the Tide coupon into the bundle and hand it to the cashier.
    • Adhere to the requirements and restrictions. Read that coupon!   If it says it says “excludes trial size”, don’t buy a trial size product and attempt to use it.   If it says $1/2, then make sure you purchase two!
    • Do not decode the barcode to misuse the coupon. Many will argue that this is a “gray” area, so many companies have been adding “per specified product” or “only on product size and description specified” to the fine print of coupons.   And just because your coupon doesn’t say that, doesn’t mean you’re free to decode.   It simply means the company hasn’t added it… yet…   However, if your store is sold out of the specified product is unavailable, sometimes stores will allow you to use it on a comparable product according to their policies.   Ask, don’t assume!

Leave some for the rest of us.
When you find an amazing deal, don’t clear the shelves.   Grab a few, and leave some behind for the next couponer who comes along.

Use the Self-Checkout Systems responsibly.
They are trusting you to check yourself out.   It’s a wonderful service, because those of us who like to see each sale price and each coupon scan, can simply do it ourselves.   But while there, scan all your products, scan coupons only for products you purchased and slip them into the coupon box as you are suppose to do!

Share and share alike.
I know.   This one is hard for me too.   I love coupons, so I tend to horde them, in fear that soon the one I gave away will be exactly the one I needed to do some deal to get some product I probably didn’t need!

Share.   Share your coupons.   Share your deals.   Share the freebie and stockpiled items you don’t really need.   Give overstock to charities, new moms who can’t get out of the house just yet, your elderly neighbor, and whoever else is in need.   Give the coupons you won’t use to someone who will.   If you’re a Pampers parent, hand over those Huggies coupons!   And if Kraft Macaroni & Cheese is free at Meijer this week, I’m sure the young mom across the street would love to know.

Keep in mind, while a coupon isn’t a law, it is a contract between the company who releases the coupon and the person who uses the coupon.   When you redeem a coupon, you’re agreeing to the fine print. Remember that CIC who hasn’t lost a case in over 20 years?   They are taking action against people who have violated the text on the coupon.

But of course, in the end, it’s not me who will judge you.   But if you want to know how I coupon, you can read My Personal Coupon Policy .

- – Additional Resources from Previous Posts – -

Confused or want more help? Don’t forget that I teach classes and speak in the Central Indiana area! Use the code ClippingMyBudget to get $10 off a public class.

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e-Course: Spotting a Fraud

by Beth Montgomery on April 17, 2010 · 1 comment

in Coupons & Rebates, Tips & Basics

This is Part 17 of the 30-day Savings Soiree e-course by In Good Cents. View the most recent course in this series or head to the Saving Soiree e-course main menu.

Want to make sure you don’t miss a new course?   Subscribe to In Good Cents via RSS or e-mail!

It’s no wonder some stores tend to look over our coupons with a fine tooth comb.   Fraudulent coupons cost manufacturers and retailers over $500 million dollars a year. To make up this cost, in the end, they pass it on to us by raising prices.   However, the entire process can take some time before anyone even realizes.

You see, once a fraudulent coupon hits the web, it’s everywhere quickly.   Millions may print and redeem it.   When the manufacturer realizes what’s happened, they notify the Coupon Information Corporation (CIC), who is in charge of getting the retailers notified.   Then retailers have to notify managers, cashiers, and other employees.   All the while, the fraudulent coupon is slipping through the cracks, but the manufacturer is no longer reimbursing the retailer, because they’ve done their part by contacting the CIC.   In the end, the store takes a huge hit, which sometimes makes them a bit “coupon shy” in the future.

As consumers who use coupons, it’s our job as well to make sure we aren’t using fraudulent coupons.   The more educated we are on the topic, the more we can avoid accidentally using an illegal coupon (and the embarrassment!), therefore helping the stores and hopefully, making them a little less “coupon shy” and more likely to take our coupons or lay down piles of policies that make it harder to get such great deals.

So, here’s my tips for spotting a fraud.   When you’re unsure about a coupon, here’s some things I’d like you to think about:

1. Did you get the coupon from a legitimate site?
If you found the coupon on a legitimate site like Coupons.com, Red Plum, Smart Source, or a manufacturer or store website, it’s likely safe to use.   It would take one really good hack to get in there and add a coupon to a site like this!

Do make sure though.   Anyone can buy domains similar to the manufacturer’s, so watch for tiny tricks like those.   It’s Meijer.com. Not MeijerGroceryStore.com!

2. Check it Out!
First, head to the CIC’s Fraudulent Coupon List and check to make sure it’s not on the list.   And if it’s not listed, double check at Hot Coupon World’s It’s Got to be Real page, since they list fraudulent coupons, as well a coupons in question at the moment.   Keep in mind though, just because it’s not listed, doesn’t mean it’s real.   It simply means that maybe the manufacturer or the CIC hasn’t been alerted yet.

3. Where did you get it?
If you didn’t get it from a legitimate site?   Where did you get that magical coupon?   Most coupons sent via e-mail will be sent directly from the manufacturer or store and explicitly state that they can not be forwarded.   If you got the coupon from a friend or family member via e-mail, there’s a high probability it’s a fraud, and the sender just didn’t realize.

Did you snag it online from a buyer?   If you’re shopping from legitimate clippers like Coupons by Dede or The Coupon Clippers, once again, you’re probably safe.   But, when buying online from e-Bay or Craigslist, beware.   While with clipping services, you are paying for the time and effort for the actual clipping, often on e-Bay, you’re paying for the coupon itself, which by the fine print voids the coupon and is illegal.   But, on top of that, it’s not unusual to find coupons on e-Bay or Craigslist that are in fact fraudulent for one reason or another!

Also avoid coupons found on message boards, forums, and similar websites.

Update: The Coupon Information Corporation has recently changed it’s Frequently Asked Questions to clearly state that buying coupons is coupon fraud, even when the seller claims they are charging for clipping of coupons and not the actual coupon.   Though why these well-known companies are still in business, I’m not sure.   So, purchase at your own risk.

4. What is the format of the coupon?
Is the coupon a PDF, JPG, GIF, or other image document?   Chances are high that it’s a fraud.   While it’s not unheard of for manufacturers or stores to release a coupon on their website in PDF format, most are smartening up and using programs like Smart Source and Brick to distribute their coupons, so they are still in control over how many they are printed.   These formats are the preferred for fraudulent coupons.

5. Is it too good to be true?
Usually fraudulent coupons are a couponers dream come true at first glance.   They are high value or even for completely FREE products.   They may have an insanely long expiration date or never expire.   It may state that it’s “reusable”.

Sorry, but here’s the truth – if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

6. Does it look legitimate?
When it comes to coupons, there are similarities between legal, legitimate coupons and stores don’t have to take them if they’re missing one of the following:

  • Expiration Date
  • Scanable Bar Code
  • Legitimate Remit To Address

However, fraudulent coupon makers are crafty, so the real coupon makers have been adding extras to make it harder to make your own or alter a coupon.   Here’s more things to look for to confirm it’s legitimate:

  • Copy Detection /Anti Copy Technology
  • Product Image
  • Watermark
  • NonStandard Text
  • Pattern Text Behind Expiration Date
  • Encrypted Unique Serial Number
  • Unique Coupon Printed Time Stamp Repeated

Coupons printed from legitimate sites, like Coupons.com or Brick, have their own unique time stamp repeated 35 times around the outside.   It says the time you printed and your user I.D.   Even if you print two from the same computer, this will still be different.   Plus, the barcode in the upper left-hand corner is a number to identify the coupon. This will also be different per coupons.

But what should make you weary? Look for:

  • Changes in font size, type, or weight
  • Blurry photos, barcodes, or text
  • Spelling or date errrors

7. Did you make it fraudulent?
I’m sure you’re thinking, “Huh? Why would I do that?”.   When I first started couponing, I came across a wonderful deal for something I loved.   I printed my two coupons, but I wanted more.   So, I stuck the coupons in my printed and made a few copies.   Luckily for me, I had a friend who stopped me before I committed coupon fraud.

Many don’t realize that each printed coupon usually has it’s own individual numbers associated with it.   This is so manufacturers can control how many are printed to keep within their allotted budget.   Copying coupons is the most common form of coupon fraud, because so many don’t even realize it’s illegal.

Think it’s innocent?   Ask the man who copied and used more than 100 coupons, thinking he’d never get caught and now has been released on $5,000 bail.

Along the same lines, do not:

  • alter, photoshop, or change coupons
  • make your own coupons

- – Consequences of Fraud – -

The CIC is in charge of prosecuting those who commit coupon fraud and they don’t hesitate to brag that they haven’t lost a case since 1986.   Here’s the penalties you can see:

  • Average: 3-5 Years Jail Sentence
    • Longest: 17 Years
  • Financial Penalties Vary. Seen in Excess of $200,000
    • Highest: $5 Million

- – What’s not a Fraud – -

There are times when a company released a coupon and it spreads throughout the coupon community.   Maybe they intend for it only to go to a certain group of consumers or a certain city.   Maybe it’s on a “hidden” URL on their website that wasn’t suppose to become known to the world.   Whatever the reason, it becomes more than the company intended.   Sometimes they may scream “fraud”, while in truth it’s not a fraudulent coupon.   It’s usually just a situation in which the release of the coupon wasn’t well thought out or the company didn’t understand how far the coupon would go.   However, the company that releases the coupon does have the right to no longer accept the coupon.

- – Additional Resources from Previous Posts – -

Confused or want more help? Don’t forget that I teach classes and speak in the Central Indiana area! Use the code ClippingMyBudget to get $10 off a public class.

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e-Course: Coupon 201

by Beth Montgomery on April 16, 2010 · 0 comments

in Coupons & Rebates, Tips & Basics

This is Part 16 of the 30-day Savings Soiree e-course by In Good Cents. View the most recent course in this series or head to the Saving Soiree e-course main menu.

Want to make sure you don’t miss a new course?   Subscribe to In Good Cents via RSS or e-mail!

We’ve been through the sales and coupons with a fine tooth comb, so now we’re going to talk about how we use them together to get the best deal possible!

Note to RSS and e-Mail Subscribers: There are videos embedded into this post, which will not appear to you.   To view it, please visit the post on the main site or check out the In Good Cents You Tube Channel.   While you’re there, don’t forget to subscribe, to get the latest videos first, before they are posted here.

- – Additional Resources from Previous Posts – -

Confused or want more help? Don’t forget that I teach classes and speak in the Central Indiana area! Use the code ClippingMyBudget to get $10 off a public class.

Grab the Saving Soiree e-Course button!

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e-Course: The Rare Coupons

by Beth Montgomery on April 15, 2010 · 0 comments

in Coupons & Rebates, Tips & Basics

This is Part 14 of the 30-day Savings Soiree e-course by In Good Cents. View the most recent course in this series or head to the Saving Soiree e-course main menu. Want to make sure you don’t miss a new course?   Subscribe to In Good Cents via RSS or e-mail!

You’re still saying it right?   This is great, but there aren’t coupons for the products I buy.   What about meat? Fruits? Vegetables? Organics? Cheese? Milk?

When it comes to finding those coupons that you just don’t see very often or can’t seem to find, the best solution is to go straight to   the source.   38% of manufacturers offer coupons only upon request, so request them!

Well, I said there are coupons for everything (almost everything) and I’m going to prove it.   Keep in mind, this is just a few resources.   Visit (or call) your favorite brands for more!

- – All-Natural, Organic,   & Non-Dairy – -

Organic coupons aren’t quite that rare anymore.   You can find them everywhere, from Coupons.com to your newspaper inserts. But, here’s a list of a few manufacturers that offer coupons on their site:

- – Glutten-Free – -

- – Meat & Seafood – -

- – Fruits/Vegetables – -

- – Cheese/Milk – -

Keep in mind, you can also often use rewards to save on the products you don’t necessarily have a coupon for, like your Extra Care Bucks or a Target Gift Card.

Can’t find a coupon?   Call the manufacturer and ask.   38% of coupons are available only upon request!

- – Additional Resources from Previous Posts – -

Confused or want more help? Don’t forget that I teach classes and speak in the Central Indiana area! Use the code ClippingMyBudget to get $10 off a public class.

Grab the Saving Soiree e-Course button!

In Good Cents Savings e-Course

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This is Part 14 of the 30-day Savings Soiree e-course by In Good Cents. View the most recent course in this series or head to the Saving Soiree e-course main menu.   Want to make sure you don’t miss a new course?   Subscribe to In Good Cents via RSS or e-mail!

We   have our coupons… and tons of them, so now what are we going to do with them?   When it comes to organizing your coupons, there is no right or wrong way.   It’s really all about what works for you.   I’ve tried many methods, until   I found the one for me. So, it may take you a while too, but that’s okay.

Like I’ve mentioned, to be a serious couponer, you can’t throw away a single coupon.   I see so many who   flip through the inserts pulling out coupons that look good to them at the time.   Then, a few weeks down the road when a great deal comes up, they realize that coupon that they skipped over and threw away, because it didn’t look so good then, now looks amazing… and it’s gone… forever

Unless you can look at a coupon and say, “I wouldn’t buy this if it was free”, then hold on to it.   It may be free sometime in the future with that exact coupon.   But since so many others are in need and you could use your power to donate the stuff your family won’t use, keep them all.   And with this many coupons, it’s a challenge to find something that holds them all.

- – Clip Them – -

Of course, there is the tried and true method of clipping every single coupon in the newspaper and that you come across, then filing them away under a certain category.     Of course, how you file them, is again up to you.   But with that many coupons, eventually, you’re going to need a BIG coupon holder.

Containers

Filing Methods

  • Alphabetically
  • Category/ Section
  • Expiration Date

Pros

  • Your coupons can be always on-hand and ready to go
  • You get to see all the coupons available while clipping, so you tend to know what you have on-hand

Cons

  • It’s time consuming to clip all those coupons
  • You have to search through all of them for expired coupons periodically
  • You’ll outgrow coupon holders that fit in your purse quickly

Time Saving Tips

  • If you get multiple inserts, stack them together to clip them quickly with one snip
  • Keep “like” coupons together
  • Make sure your container has a lid, so you don’t end up playing “the coupon pick-up game” in store when your toddler decides to drop them

Who Uses This Method

- – Don’t Clip Them – -

Have too many coupons or short on time?   Don’t clip them.   Many pro couponers don’t, because they just have too many to clip.   Simply file the inserts away by the date your received them and clip them when you plan to use them.

Containers

Filing Methods

  • Insert Date

Pros

  • You ‘ll have all the coupons on hand
  • It saves LOTS of time
  • It’s easy to find coupons that match deals on frugal blogs

Cons

  • You can’t carry all your inserts with you, so at stores you might not have a coupon on hand if you see a great deal or want to change up your shopping plan
  • It’s harder to find coupons without a coupon database, since you can’t just head to the “baby” section to pull out a diaper coupon
  • It takes up a lot of space to keep all the inserts and magazines
  • You’ll have loose coupons from samples, the internet, and other sources

Time Saving Tips

  • Write the date on each insert in LARGE BOLD print to find it quickly
  • Add the date the last coupon expires from the insert to the front too, so you know when you can throw out the insert
  • Use clear dividers in binders to see your coupons easily

Who Uses This Method

- – The Combo – -

I tried clipping, but I’d get so far behind and my coupon holder was outrageously large.   So, I tried not clipping, but often missed great deals, because I didn’t have coupons I needed on hand.   So, now I do a combination.

Each week, I look through the insert and clip coupons that I often use, often find great deals on, and for product I love.   Then, I leave the rest in the insert.   I use a black marker to put the insert date and the date the last coupon expires in bold on the top where I can quickly find it and easily see it.

I have a small wallet-size coupon organizer that   doesn’t have a lot of personality, but gets the job done.   And I keep it in my purse, so I always have my coupon that I typically use with me.   Plus, I have envelopes in the front for coupons I plan to use and a special place for high-value or FREE coupons that I definitely want to use, so I don’t forget I have them and can check them out in store.   Then, I hijacked space in my husband’s file cabinets to stick the coupon inserts by date.

Pros

  • Its saves me TONS of time
  • I usually have coupons on-hand
  • I have somewhere to put those loose coupons from samples, internet. etc…
  • I don’t waste time clipping coupons I’ll never use

Cons

  • Sometimes I don’t have a coupon on hand when I find a great price in-store
  • It’s harder to find coupons without a coupon database, since you can’t just head to the “baby” section to pull out a diaper coupon
  • It takes up a lot of space to keep all the inserts and magazines

Tell me. How do you organize your coupons???

- – Additional Resources from Previous Posts – -

Confused or want more help? Don’t forget that I teach classes and speak in the Central Indiana area! Use the code ClippingMyBudget to get $10 off a public class.

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This is Part 13 of the 30-day Savings Soiree e-course by In Good Cents. View the most recent course in this series or head to the Saving Soiree e-course main menu.

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(Updated: May 17, 2011.)

We’ve already deciphered the circulars, but those coupons aren’t so self explanatory either! Often even cashiers and managers don’t quite understand what the fine print means.

So, lets talk about the who, what, when, where, why, and how of coupons… Okay, well, there’s no why, other than because we love coupons, but you get the point.

Who?

Limit 1 Per Customer/Person
If you’re only one person or one customer, you can only use one of these coupons. For example, if you have two $1/1 Dawn dish detergent coupons and want to buy two bottles of Dawn, but find this at the bottom, you’ll have to convince your spouse, child, etc… to make the second purchase.

Keep in mind, unless you have a loyalty shoppers card, most stores can’t track your coupons and/or purchases, so you may be able to do multiple transactions or make multiple trips to and still manage to meet the coupon’s terms. It’s going to depend on your store.

Limit 1 Per Household/Family
Like with the “Limit 1 Per Customer/Person” coupons, you can only use one of these coupons. You won’t be able to send your husband through, but maybe your neighbor.

However, just like with the above, unless you have a loyalty shoppers card, most stores can’t track your coupons and/or purchases, so you may be able to do multiple transactions or make multiple trips to and still manage to meet the coupon’s terms. It’s going to depend on your store.

Limit 1 Per Purchase/Item Purchased
Sigh… how many of you have stood in line with your cart full, coupons in hand, and glowing in the brilliance of your well thought out shopping trip. Then, you hand your coupons to the cashier, who looks at them and says, “Oh, you can’t use two of these. It says one per purchase.” Raise your hand. Almost all of you? Yeah, many of us couponers have been there.

Next time, I want you to put on your doe-eyed innocent face, smile politely and say, “Oh good, because I’m purchasing two. See… 1… 2.”

Often purchase and transaction are confused, but “one per purchase” or “one per item purchased” simply means that you can only use one coupon per item. If it’s a $1/1, you can use two, if you buy two.

Limit 1 Per Transaction
Now this one is different. It’s per transaction. So, no matter how many you’re buying, you can only use one, unless you break it up into separate transactions or make multiple trips.

What?

Product Description
No, it won’t say “product description” on your coupons. I’m talking about the text like “Valid on Tide liquid laundry detergent 100 ounce bottle”. That means, you can only use it on that particular size and version of tide. You can’t buy the powder or the trial size.

Some think that if it scans without beeping, it’s okay. Technically, that’s not true. If a coupon says “valid only one Honey-Nut Cheerios” and you use it on the regular Cheerios, the manufacturer does not have to reimburse the store and you’ve used a coupon other than how it was intended, which is technically coupon fraud. So, pay attention read it carefully and use it as stated.

Excludes Trial Sizes
It’s simple. You can’t buy the trial size. However, if you don’t find this on a coupon, you can sometimes snag some FREEbies on certain products like laundry detergent, lotion, shampoo, and toothpaste, in the trial size. Remember, at times, using your coupon on the smaller size, actually saves you more. It’s all about those unit prices!

Excludes… / Does Not Apply To…
This coupon isn’t valid on whatever is excluded. If it excludes conditioner, then you can’t buy conditioner. Depending on the product description though, you may be able to buy shampoo, hair color, gel, or hairspray. Just, unfortunately, not that conditioner.

Valid Only On …
And this is just the opposite. If it says “valid only on conditioner”, then that’s the one and only product you can use this coupon on, so don’t pick up that shampoo.

Valid on Regular Priced Items Only
Unfortunately, you can’t use this coupon to snag a great deal on a clearance or sale item, since you can only use it on a standard, regular price item.

Where?

Redeem at …
This one is tricky. Often this is just the store simply trying to encourage you to use the coupon at their location, but if it’s a manufacturer coupon, it’s valid anywhere that accepts manufacturer coupons. However, it’s up to the stores discretion to refuse to accept coupons with other store’s logos or names on them, so simply ask your store’s policy.

Redeem Only at …
With this one, there’s no wiggle room. If it’s only valid at store XYZ or in a certain state or city, then that’s the only place you can use it. Unless you have a local store that accepts competitor coupons.

Offer Not Valid at …
Also, with this one, there is also no wiggle room. Some coupons just aren’t valid in a certain city, state, or even store for many reasons. It may be a state law or a store policy, but whatever the reason, you can’t use the coupon there. For example, in Indiana, you can’t require the purchase of alcohol to receive a discount, so alcohol coupons and rebates aren’t valid here.

When?

Expires December 31, 2012
It’s VERY rare that you’d find a coupon without an expiration date. In fact, many stores won’t even accept coupons that don’t have one and that’s their right, since it’s a common trait of fraudulent coupons. It may be written in many different ways like “valid until 12/31/11″ or “offer good through December 15, 2011″, but it all means the same – you can’t use this coupon after that date.

Yes, like with all rules, there are exceptions. Some stores accept expired coupons. Check with your store to see if they do and if they don’t you can’t legally use them past the date listed.

Valid 12/31/11-12/31/12
While some coupons simply expire, others mention a start date too. If it’s not yet December 31, 2010, then this coupon isn’t valid yet and you can’t use it. Hold on to it though, because you may find a great deal when it does become valid.

While Supplies Last
It’s rare, and usually only seen on rebates for coupon booklets or other free items or store coupons, but some may be good while supplies are in stock only. What does that mean? Well, if they don’t have it, you can’t get it or, obviously, use your coupon.

How?

Valid Only With This Coupon
For this one, I often want to say “duh”, but it’s found on coupons and that means, if you don’t have the coupon, you can’t get the discount. Watch, because there are sale notices that may look like coupons, but don’t require a coupon to get the discount. You may even be able to stack coupons on top of it, depending on the offer and your store.

Online/In-Store Only
If it’s valid online only, you can’t use it in store and vice versa.

Can’t Be Combined with Other Offers
This will depend on the coupon. Typically, it means you can’t combine it with other discounts, like a Senior Citizen’s discount, student discount, or employee discount. It also means that you can’t combine it with other like discounts or offers. So, if it’s a manufacturer coupon, you can’t use another manufacturer coupon and same for a store coupon.

Valid Only with … Card
You can use the coupon, but you’ll have to present your membership, loyalty, or rewards card. For example, you’ll have to pull your Cosco Membership, Kroger Plus Card, or T.G.I. Friday’s Get More Stripes Reward Card.

This Coupon Can Not Be Exchanged for Cash
It’s there and often seen on coupons. You have to buy something and the coupon value will come off of your purchase total. You won’t be given cash in exchange for the coupon.

Do Not Double/Triple
While stores cover the extra cost, manufacturers often don’t want coupons to double or triple. Why? Well, it all comes down to the bottom line – their budget. But, for you, it means, even if you take this coupon to a store that doubles or triples coupons, the store should not do so.

Now, some coupons, like those that begin with a 5, typically double regardless, if your store double/triples coupons and the coupon is within the store’s double/triple policy. Those coupons that start with a 9 will not automatically double no matter what. It’s all going to depend on your store.   Keep in mind, since doubling a coupon that clearly states “do not double” is against the coupon’s terms, your store has the right to refuse to double that coupon.

Additional Resources from Previous Posts

Confused or want more help? Don’t forget that I teach classes and speak in the Central Indiana area! Use the code ClippingMyBudget to get $10 off a public class.

Grab the Saving Soiree e-Course button!

In Good Cents Savings e-Course

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